Words Students Confuse - Peak and Peek

ScottsEnglishScottsEnglish Administrator Posts: 1,060 admin ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
edited February 4 in Grammar

Homonyms are words that sound alike but have different meanings. 

A student recently wrote, "In that year she reached the peek of her success."

The correct word should be peak, which means "the top, the highest point." Peek means "to look quickly at, to perceive, to glance."

For example, the top part of a mountain is called the peak. The verb form, to peak, means to arrive at the top. For example, "The flood waters peaked at two meters above the river's normal level before the rain stopped."

The verb peak can also mean "tired, worn". As an example, "After a full day of rugby practice, the men were peaked."

Peek is usually used as a verb, for example, "Close your eyes and don't peek. I am going to give you a surprise!" It can also be a noun in the expression, take a peek. "John took a peek at his results before they were officially released and was disappointed."

Choose the right word for the following sentences:

1. Take a _________________ at the book I bought for Samantha's birthday.
2. He looks __________________ after such a hard workout.
3.The Confederate Army was at the __________________ of its success in 1863 against the Union.
4. __________________into the box and look at the kittens!
5. We made it to the ____________________ just as the sun was setting.

Click here for the correct answers.

1. Take a peek at the book I bought for Samantha's birthday.
2. He looks peaked after such a hard workout.
3.The Confederate Army was at the peak of its success in 1863 against the Union.
4. Peek into the box and look at the kittens!
5. We made it to the peak just as the sun was setting.

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