Words Students Confuse: You're leaving or your leaving?

ScottsEnglishScottsEnglish Administrator Posts: 1,198 admin ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
edited August 28 in Grammar
We received an essay with this sentence. 'You're leaving has caused a lot of problems at the office."

But this sentence is wrong. It should be, Your leaving has caused a lot of problems at the office.

Why?

Because the construction 'your leaving' is the subject of the verb, 'has', and not the present continuous tense. 

If you are not sure, look for a second verb in the sentence. "You're going to the market" means "You are going to the market", while "Your going to the park makes me jealous" has a second verb, makes.

Try these sentences.

1. ______________________ singing tomorrow at the folk festival.

2. ___________________ singing is pretty good - have you had lessons?

3. ____________________ driving needs a little improvement.

4. Don't forget, __________________ driving everyone tomorrow.

5. ____________________ playing piano for the choir this year.
 
6. ____________________ playing has definitely improved!

Click here for the correct answers.

1. You're singing tomorrow at the folk festival.

2. Your singing is pretty good - have you had lessons?

3. Your driving needs a little improvement.

4. Don't forget, you're driving everyone tomorrow.

5. You're playing piano for the choir this year.
 
6. Your playing has definitely improved!
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