Words Students Confuse - Quit, quite, and quiet

ScottsEnglishScottsEnglish Administrator Posts: 1,198 admin ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
edited April 23 in Grammar
These three words look alike, and students often use them incorrectly. 

'Quit' is an irregular verb - quit/ quit/ quit - which means to stop doing something. For example, "I quit playing basketball when I hurt my ankle", and "He has quit school recently in order to start a new company.'

'Quite' is an adverb which is used like the word 'very', in order to emphasize something. For example, "She is quite good at maths and wants to become an engineer" and "I felt quite lonely after the children went off to university."

'Quiet' is a noun or an adjective which means the absence of sound. For example, "The library is a quiet place to study at exam time" and "We all need a time of quiet to relax at the end of the day."

Put the right word in the following sentences.

1. The exam was ________________ difficult, and I don't think I did very well.

2. Many people want to ______________ their jobs but can't because they need the money.

3. The classroom has a _____________________ corner for kids who want to read.

4. It can get _________________ hot in August in the South of the United States.

5. When the old man rose to speak, the room suddenly became _________________.

6. As she got older, she _________________ using her car and took the bus to work.

Click here for the correct answers.

1. The exam was quite difficult, and I don't think I did very well.
2. Many people want to quit their jobs but can't because they need the money.
3. The classroom has a quiet corner for kids who want to read.
4. It can get quite hot in August in the South of the United States.
5. When the old man rose to speak, the room suddenly became quiet.
6. As she got older, she quit using her car and took the bus to work.
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